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[The Desert Sun] Workshop weighs health effects of CV Link
Oct 28, 2014 | Article

[The Desert Sun] Workshop weighs health effects of CV Link

The public is getting a chance to voice its thoughts about the potential effect the CV Link recreation path could someday have on quality of life in the Coachella Valley, as a study of the project’s potential health impacts gets underway.Concerns raised Tuesday during a workshop at College of the Desert included the proposed route’s proximity to parking and public transportation, how it may affect traffic and air quality, and whether it’s wise for cyclists to share a path with low-speed electric vehicles such as golf carts.
[KPCC] California's children falling through the cracks, says study on kids' well-being
Oct 29, 2014 | Article

[KPCC] California's children falling through the cracks, says study on kids' well-being

New information out Wednesday shows kids across 58 counties in California are faring poorly overall when it comes to education, health and socio-economic outcomes. Compiled every two years by the nonpartisan research group, Children Now, the 2014-2015 scorecard paints a bleak picture for many California children, particularly those who live in counties with concentrations of impoverished families.
Special Event: Bringing to Light the Struggle of Cambodian Immigrants and Their Families
Oct 30, 2014 | Blog

Special Event: Bringing to Light the Struggle of Cambodian Immigrants and Their Families

April 17, 2015 will mark the 40 year anniversary of the Khmer Rouge takeover of Cambodia, which ushered in a four year reign of terror in which 2 million Cambodians died (approximately 25% of the total population).  Those who survived experienced ...
[Oakland Tribune] Editorial: Berkeley voters should support soda tax
Oct 29, 2014 | Article

[Oakland Tribune] Editorial: Berkeley voters should support soda tax

Obesity results when someone eats and drinks more calories than he or she burns. The largest single source of excess calories in the American diet is from soda and other sugar-sweetened drinks. Obesity presents serious risk of diseases such as diabetes, hypertension and heart disease, and contributes to rising medical costs. Twenty-five percent of California adults are obese; 7 percent have Type 2 diabetes. Those are the facts. We acknowledged them in 2012, when we opposed Richmond's effort to tax businesses that sell sodas. We had hoped a less heavy-handed policy approach could be found. We urged a statewide solution that began with education.
Oct 29, 2014 | Article

[Contra Costa Times] Oakland: Corner stores get a healthy outlook

OAKLAND -- Residents and community leaders from Oakland's flatlands are collaborating with corner store owners to bring high quality and nutritious foods directly to store shelves. Hope Collaborative, a group of Oakland residents, organizations and agencies, recently launched the Healthy Corner Store Project, a food initiative that lines shelves with apples, oranges, potatoes and corn. "It's been really challenging to get a grocery store to come into West Oakland and we believe in that need being filled, but there are also those existing infrastructures that residents utilize daily," said Hope Collaborative Project Coordinator Angela Hadwin. The Healthy Corner Store Project connects corner stores with financing opportunities, community and technical support. The project promotes resident leadership in building an efficient neighborhood-based food system that will ultimately revitalize neighborhood corner stores.
Oct 29, 2014 | Article

[Modesto Bee] Efforts to curb health care woes underway

It has been quite a year. More than 3 million of you signed up for new health coverage in California. But many of you couldn’t find doctors who accepted your plans. Some of you were charged hundreds or thousands of dollars for desperately needed prescription medications. And let’s not forget Medi-Cal, where legions waited for months to find out if their applications had been processed or couldn’t get help when complicated (and high-stakes) renewal forms landed in their mailboxes. State lawmakers responded by trying to legislate changes. Gov. Jerry Brown and his veto pen, of course, had the final say. In today’s column, I diverge from my usual formula of answering readers’ questions. Instead, I’ll explain which new laws will – or won’t – make your health coverage easier to use.
[Contra Costa Times] Oakland: Corner stores get a healthy outlook
Oct 29, 2014 | Article

[Contra Costa Times] Oakland: Corner stores get a healthy outlook

Residents and community leaders from Oakland's flatlands are collaborating with corner store owners to bring high quality and nutritious foods directly to store shelves. Hope Collaborative, a group of Oakland residents, organizations and agencies, recently launched the Healthy Corner Store Project, a food initiative that lines shelves with apples, oranges, potatoes and corn.
[The Salinas Californian] Monterey school district serves local food
Oct 28, 2014 | Article

[The Salinas Californian] Monterey school district serves local food

A school district in Monterey is one of 15 districts in California that is trying to serve its students locally grown foods, but the task is far more onerous than it would seem on the surface. Monterey Peninsula Unified School District has joined forces with the Center for Ecoliteracy to cook locally grown and raised foods for cafeteria lunches. Called "California Thursdays," the program launched at MPUSD on Oct. 23 and is based on the belief that California children will benefit from more freshly prepared foods, grown or raised within the Golden State.
[Huffington Post] School to Prison Pipeline: Reading Abilities Matter
Oct 29, 2014 | Article

[Huffington Post] School to Prison Pipeline: Reading Abilities Matter

Mrs. Warren, I love you!" Andrew* (one of my students) yelled as I gave him a high five after connecting the events to the story in A Lesson Before Dying and the Trial of Troy Davis. The other kids laughed at his outburst, but we kept moving so that we could finish the discussion and work for the day. When he yelled that out in class, our class was 'knee deep' in reading the novel about a mentally handicapped defendant, Jefferson, who was sentenced to death for a crime he did not commit. My kids (especially my young men) were mesmerized with the injustice that was taking place. Kids debated if Jefferson was guilty of any crime, while others countered that he should have known not to get in the car with Brother and his friend while they were drinking. While my class was particularly noisy and boisterous on that day, I loved that a piece of literature was engaging them in 'real life' issues.While this outburst that was so random was a small snippet in my interaction with this particular student, it always made me laugh as I thought about him long after he left the halls of my high school.
[The Crime Report] Viewpoint: Breaking the School-to-Prison Pipeline
Oct 29, 2014 | Article

[The Crime Report] Viewpoint: Breaking the School-to-Prison Pipeline

Less than two weeks ago, Dr. John Deasy, superintendent of the Los Angeles Unified School District, resigned after three years at the second largest school system in the U.S. In his October 15th letter of resignation to the school board, he mentioned a number of efforts that had “contributed to a healthier, safer, and more respectful environment for youth to learn and thrive,” such as the student climate bill of rights, the implementation of restorative justice practices, the elimination of thecharge of “willful defiance” to suspend youth, and the elimination of citations for low-level infractions. Deasy’s accomplishments in improving school climate, with the aid of organizations such as the Youth Justice Coalition and The California Endowment, will help decrease the racial and ethnic disparities in school suspensions in Los Angeles.
[KPCC] South Los Angeles residents push to transform railway to 8-mile greenbelt
Oct 29, 2014 | Article

[KPCC] South Los Angeles residents push to transform railway to 8-mile greenbelt

Jameca Marshall has navigated Slauson Avenue all her life, and she knows how dangerous it is. "I see folks there walking, I see them biking. I see folks pushing strollers in conditions that most of us would not want to be pushing baby strollers, and moving and trying to get to work," said Marshall, a life-long resident of South Los Angeles. She was one of about three-dozen residents who attended a meeting of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority last week, asking them to move forward with a project to transform eight miles of abandoned roadway into a bike and pedestrian path. Most of the property is owned by the MTA.
[East Bay Express] California Ingredients Make a Comeback in Oakland Schools
Oct 29, 2014 | Article

[East Bay Express] California Ingredients Make a Comeback in Oakland Schools

For the past year, students in Oakland have been getting something different on their cafeteria trays — not frozen pizza or a burrito assembled in a factory several thousand miles away, but a healthful meal made entirely out of California ingredients: a chicken leg roasted with lemon and oregano, say, or a yakisoba noodle bowl with tofu. The meals are part of California Thursdays, an initiative of the Berkeley-based Center for Ecoliteracy that the Oakland Unified School District has been piloting for the past year. With the catchphrase, "California food for California kids," the program features school lunches made with ingredients that originate in California and are cooked fresh in the district's kitchen facilities. On October 23, the initiative officially launched statewide. Fifteen school districts, including OUSD, formally adopted California Thursdays. Other districts that have signed on include Elk Grove, Los Angeles, Monterey Peninsula, San Diego, and San Francisco.
[ABC 30 Action News] FRESNO SUPERVISORS TO DECIDE FUTURE OF MEDICAL CARE FOR THE UNDOCUMENTED
Oct 29, 2014 | Article

[ABC 30 Action News] FRESNO SUPERVISORS TO DECIDE FUTURE OF MEDICAL CARE FOR THE UNDOCUMENTED

FRESNO, Calif. (KFSN) -- A noisy rally was held outside Fresno's Community Regional Medical Center on Tuesday by a group who wants Fresno County to make sure the undocumented poor continue to get the medical treatment they need. Protestor Maria Chavez told Action News, "I would like the Board of Supervisors to take a look at their community the people they support and the people that support them and help us to stay healthy." Fresno County has been paying CRMC about $20 million a year for the care. But the new Federal Health Care law shifted those funds and does not allow the money to be used to treat undocumented people. The county's deal with CRMC is set to end on December 1st.
[Fresno Bee] Valley children’s well-being: Report shows need for improvement in education, health and welfare
Oct 29, 2014 | Article

[Fresno Bee] Valley children’s well-being: Report shows need for improvement in education, health and welfare

A report released today on the well-being of children in California counties shows a need for improvement in the education, health and economic welfare of youngsters in the central San Joaquin Valley. Based on a five-star rating system, with one star indicating a county is among the lowest-performing, Valley counties did not reach above three stars in the categories of education, health and welfare. Kings and Madera counties had three stars for welfare and economic well-being and Tulare County had three stars in education. Tulare and Kings were near the bottom statewide, at 1.5 stars, in child health. Fresno County had 2.5 stars across the board for education, health and welfare. Statewide, no county scored a perfect five stars in any category, according to the 2014-15 California County Scorecard of Children’s Well-Being by Children Now. Read more here: http://www.fresnobee.com/2014/10/29/4203585_valley-childrens-well-being-report.html?rh=1#storylink=cpy
[Bakersfield Californian] Kern County lags state on health, economic measures for kids
Oct 29, 2014 | Article

[Bakersfield Californian] Kern County lags state on health, economic measures for kids

A child advocacy group has given Kern County dismal ratings for the educational, health and economic environment it provides for local youngsters. On a scale of one to five stars -- five being best -- Children Now gave Kern 2 1/2 stars for education, 1 1/2 stars for health, and 2 1/2 stars for child welfare and economic well-being.
[Merced Sun-Star] Scorecard rates children’s well-being in Merced County
Oct 29, 2014 | Article

[Merced Sun-Star] Scorecard rates children’s well-being in Merced County

A new report that uses stars to rate a county’s ability to meet children’s needs gives Merced County two stars out of a possible five in the category of health and 21/2 stars in education. The Children’s Well-Being Scorecard, released Wednesday by the Children Now organization, provides a look into the well-being of children in the state’s 58 counties. The county-level data is organized in three different categories: health, education, and child welfare and economic well-being. Merced County received three stars in the last category. The star rating quickly communicates how each county is doing compared to other counties, said Jessica Mindnich, director of research at Children Now, during a webinar Tuesday. According to the report’s education data for Merced County, 33 percent of children ages 3 and 4 attend preschool and 41 percent of third-graders read at grade level.
[Washington Post] No hoodies for my son
Oct 29, 2014 | Article

[Washington Post] No hoodies for my son

When my husband and I found out we were having a boy, it was a bittersweet moment for me. A mini panic, in fact. The recent killings of young black men could not be ignored. Trayvon Martin, Eric Garner, Mike Brown. The beating of Rodney King. The murder of Emmett Till. Having a son, I felt an immense sense of responsibility. Maybe more than bringing a black woman into the world (we already have a 2 ½ year old daughter). I didn’t know how to raise a son, a black son, and I wanted to do it right.
[Kaiser Health News] Soda Makers Battle Proposed Taxes In Berkeley, San Francisco
Oct 29, 2014 | Article

[Kaiser Health News] Soda Makers Battle Proposed Taxes In Berkeley, San Francisco

BERKELEY, Calif. — Again and again in the United States, anti-obesity crusaders have been stymied wherever they’ve tried to impose new laws on soda sales: in New York, ex-Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s plan to limit soda size was tossed out by the state’s highest court, proposed taxes in the northern California cities of El Monte and Richmond were voted down and the Washington, D.C. city council failed to pass an excise tax on soda. Yet the successful enactment earlier this year of a nationwide tax on sugary drinks in Mexico has been a shot across the bow of Coca-Cola, Pepsi and other big soda makers, with Coca-Cola announcing a drop in profits, in part because of a decline in sales in its Latin American business. Now, the soda industry is going to war in a pair of election battles in San Francisco and Berkeley, two of the most liberal cities in the U.S.
[Valley Public Radio] Seven Months After Gas Leak Arvin Residents Still Can't Return Home
Oct 29, 2014 | Article

[Valley Public Radio] Seven Months After Gas Leak Arvin Residents Still Can't Return Home

Earlier this year eight Kern County families were forced out of their homes because of a gas leak. Now, seven months later families are still asking questions about their health and when they can return to their neighborhood.
[Richmond Confidential] The Golden State Warriors unveil a renovated basketball court in Richmond
Oct 29, 2014 | Article

[Richmond Confidential] The Golden State Warriors unveil a renovated basketball court in Richmond

Luck struck on the Martin Luther King basketball court as the last drops of rain fell and the ceremony of face-painted children with balloons and basketballs began. “Let’s have a wonderful day in Richmond,” said former Golden State Warrior and All-star player Mitch Richmond, who will be giving his name to the court. The court, part of the recreational fields of the Martin Luther King Park in Coronado, were refurbished during the summer when the Warriors team decided to invest in Richmond. The 14,000 square foot court has the yellow and blue Golden State Warriors logo painted on it. “We want to try and create healthy communities, a safe place for kids to play,” said Diane Aranda of the California Endowment, the Warriors’ partner in this project. Said Warriors Community Foundation Executive Director Jose Gordon; “I think our work with the California Endowment is going to be a long partnership.”
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