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[Press Enterprise] EDUCATION: Schools eye breakfast in classrooms
Apr 08, 2015 |

[Press Enterprise] EDUCATION: Schools eye breakfast in classrooms

On a recent Friday after the morning school bell, Madison Elementary School teacher Sarah Francis sat at her desk checking homework and preparing for the day. Meanwhile, her 6th-graders read or talked quietly while munching on warm taco-nadas, a breakfast empanada filled with meat and cheese. Then they washed them down with milk. A free breakfast in the classroom has started the day for the Riverside school’s estimated 725 students since August 2012.
[Los Angeles Times] Most Californians support serving breakfast to students during school day
Apr 09, 2015 |

[Los Angeles Times] Most Californians support serving breakfast to students during school day

California voters strongly support serving breakfast to students during the school day, with most linking a nutritious morning meal to improved academic achievement, according to a new statewide poll. The Field Poll found that two-thirds of California registered voters surveyed supported a proposal to require campuses to serve breakfast during class hours rather than before, as most schools currently do. Three-fourths said breakfast would improve academic performance and favored using existing federal funds to pay for the meals.
[New Times] A new program in San Luis Obispo County will give misdemeanor offenders a second chance
Apr 08, 2015 |

[New Times] A new program in San Luis Obispo County will give misdemeanor offenders a second chance

If the plan works—and if it keeps in line with some other counties that have tried the same—San Luis Obispo County law enforcement officials believe they can take as many as 1,000 low-level misdemeanor cases out of court. That would mean less prosecutor time devoted to filing cases for offenses such as petty theft, driving without a license, and possessing small amounts of certain drugs. It would mean youthful screw-ups won’t forever haunt people on job applications. And, ideally, it could mean that people caught for a first-time offense would be less likely to get tossed back into the legal system again.
[Reporting On Health] Big Gulps for Little Leagues: We can’t jog our way out of our high-calorie diets
Apr 10, 2015 |

[Reporting On Health] Big Gulps for Little Leagues: We can’t jog our way out of our high-calorie diets

I’ve written before in my Big Gulps for Little Leagues series how companies like Coca-Cola were sponsoring youth sports while selling them drinks – including high-calorie juice and energy drinks – that were unhealthy. The marketing of juice and energy drinks has been so successful that parents see them as healthy options for kids.
[Your Central Valley] Fresno Boys and Men of Color
Apr 09, 2015 |

[Your Central Valley] Fresno Boys and Men of Color

The Central California Children's Institute has partnered with the California Endowment on an initiative to mobilize community resources to reduce health and social disparities among boys and men of color in Fresno County -- particularly Latinos. Watch to see how Building Healthy Communities and the Fresno Boys and Men of Color are trying to set standards in Fresno County to help the community involvement. The More You Know discusses setting standards for learning and helping children grow, and this organization is doing just that.
[Richmond Pulse] When Richmond Men Read, Kids Listen
Apr 08, 2015 |

[Richmond Pulse] When Richmond Men Read, Kids Listen

When Ron Shaw stood up to read the children’s book, “Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People’s Ears,” his audience — second-graders at North Richmond’s Verde Elementary School — stared, giggled and raised their hands to ask questions. Shaw thumbed through the pages of the West African tale, reading the colorful story about a mosquito who tells a lie to an iguana and annoys him. By the end of the story, the youngsters tugged at Shaw’s leg, their way of thanking him for coming to their class.
[We'Ced] Residents Speak Out on the Effects of Violence in Merced
Apr 09, 2015 |

[We'Ced] Residents Speak Out on the Effects of Violence in Merced

Merced County just counted its ninth homicide of 2015 a few days ago. The previous year had the most homicides on record in the county at 31. Many of the Merced County victims have been young people of color, like the young man shot and killed in Winton earlier this week and a Merced teen who was shot and killed in the parking lot of Tenaya Middle School back in February. Much of the media coverage around the violence has focused on law enforcement, gang activity and property values. We’ced youth reporters asked our community members a different question: How has violence affected your life?
[Fresno Bee] Michael Alexander and Rosemary Caso: Don’t cut coverage for 1 million children
Apr 09, 2015 |

[Fresno Bee] Michael Alexander and Rosemary Caso: Don’t cut coverage for 1 million children

With the May deadline for finalizing California’s budget looming, our state leaders need an answer from the U.S. Senate on whether it will deliver on more than a half a billion dollars in annual federal funding promised to California families for their kids’ health insurance coverage. The Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) is a critical source of coverage for low- and moderate-income working families that makes sure California’s kids get the care they need to stay healthy and succeed. This proven program has the overwhelming support of 41 Republican and Democratic governors, including California’s, but federal funding for the program is set to expire soon.
[Sacramento Bee] State goes it alone on immigration, too
Apr 10, 2015 |

[Sacramento Bee] State goes it alone on immigration, too

As Congress remains paralyzed on immigration, California Democrats have put forth a state-levelpackage. Building on the immigrant driver’s licenses approved last year – a move that has deluged the Department of Motor Vehicles with an incredible 500,000-plus applications – the lawmakers propose a bold, even comprehensive approach. There are some much-needed ideas, such as fraud protections against unscrupulous immigration attorneys. There are some long shots, such as offering Medi-Cal to the undocumented.
[Families USA] ACA Enrollment Drives Historic Decline in Uninsurance for Communities of Color
Apr 09, 2015 |

[Families USA] ACA Enrollment Drives Historic Decline in Uninsurance for Communities of Color

Health care advocates across the nation are celebrating the milestone of nearly 11.7 million Americans gaining health insurance through the second open enrollment period of the Affordable Care Act. At the same time, the latest enrollment numbers from the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) have led some to characterizeenrollment of communities of color as “lagging.” What is getting less attention is the new HHS data showing a huge reduction in the disproportionately highrates of uninsured people of color.
[Sacramento Bee] Help immigrants find their way through complex process
Apr 08, 2015 |

[Sacramento Bee] Help immigrants find their way through complex process

From the fields of California’s agricultural heartland to the skyscrapers of our greatest cities, immigrants are helping to drive our state forward. Despite their profound contributions to our economy and culture, too many immigrants face steep obstacles to fully participating in California’s economic and civic life. As this year’s budget process moves forward, we have the opportunity to make a small investment in the inclusion and integration of immigrants – one that promises to yield big returns.
In Memoriam: Len Aube
Apr 10, 2015 |

In Memoriam: Len Aube

A note mixed with sadness and appreciation, as Annenberg Foundation Executive Director Len Aube passed away yesterday.   Len was a great friend and colleague, and an inspiring leader in the philanthropic landscape of California.   He served the Annenberg...
[South Kern Sol] Lessons learned from a box of raisins
Apr 07, 2015 |

[South Kern Sol] Lessons learned from a box of raisins

Have you ever been a teenager working in the fields turning grapes into raisins in the summer heat? My name is Bianca Pulido and I worked in the fields last summer here in Arvin. I can now imagine the huge struggle that field workers go through every day to put food on their table. While it was not my first job, it was my first experience working in the fields. I began this job the last few days of my junior year. I left school at 2:57 every day, then went home to eat, do some homework, and wait for my mom to get out of her first job. She is a single mother of 4 girls and she has always been a very hard working lady. At this time she held 2 jobs and neither were easy. One of them was working in the fields and the other was working at Grimmway Farms as a packer. It killed me to see her come home tired every afternoon and have to get ready for her next job. So one day when she came home I told her, “Sabes que mamá quiero trabajar contigo en la tarde” (You know what mom, I want to work with you in the evenings). She told me to stop speaking nonsense. I replied, “No really, how hard can it be? I’m just going to pick grapes, right?” Giving me a knowing look, she finally agreed: “Okay, fine, you want to work in the fields, let’s go then.”
[The Hill] ObamaCare's remarkable progress
Apr 07, 2015 |

[The Hill] ObamaCare's remarkable progress

As it celebrates its fifth anniversary, President Obama's landmark health reform is now on course to join Social Security as an indispensable and widely embraced anchor of everyday life for large numbers of Americans. Pundits still focus on the challenges and controversies ObamaCare has faced, but from a broader historical perspective, its progress has been surprisingly fast and smooth. Today, Social Security enjoys nearly universal support, but that was hardly the case when it was first enacted in 1935 or during the early years of implementation. Political and business opponents remained fiercely opposed, and in 1939, President Franklin Roosevelt had to go back to Congress for significant revisions to taxes and benefits. During World War II, taxes for Social Security were suspended and repealers said the law was unworkable and tried to leave it for dead. Things improved as the law expanded and benefits flowed from the 1950s. But it was not actually until the presidency of Richard Nixon, decades after enactment, that Social Security was broadly embraced and its benefits were made sufficiently generous and protected from the ravages of inflation to allow Americans to count on it for a dignified retirement.
[The Hill] Punished twice: Immigrants denied health coverage, penalized anyway
Apr 07, 2015 |

[The Hill] Punished twice: Immigrants denied health coverage, penalized anyway

ax Day is almost here. This year, thanks to special enrollment periods announced for the states that use the healthcare.gov platform and many state-based health insurance marketplaces, tax season comes with an opportunity for more people who haven’t yet gotten health coverage under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) to sign up for coverage for 2015.
 But unfortunately, for many immigrants these special enrollment periods are no more than a frustrating reminder of how they have been systematically left out of the ACA’s promise of quality, affordable health care for everyone.
[Sacramento Bee] Democrats push to extend health, legal rights to immigrants
Apr 07, 2015 |

[Sacramento Bee] Democrats push to extend health, legal rights to immigrants

SACRAMENTO, CALIF. Responding to federal inaction over immigration reform, California Democrats on Tuesday will propose a package of 10 bills that would extend health care, legal rights and business protection to immigrants who are illegally living in the state. Assembly Speaker Toni Atkins, D-San Diego, and Senate President Pro Tem Kevin de Leon, D-Los Angeles, will lead the majority party's push to expand health coverage to all Californians, regardless of their immigration status, although they are not proposing any funding to pay for the extensions. The package includes help for immigrants to apply for legal status if they have been a victim of a crime and assistance for the recent surge of immigrant children crossing the border to stay in the country, according to a legislative source who was briefed on the proposal but not authorized to discuss it before its release. Another bill bans businesses from discriminating against a person on the basis of their immigration status, citizenship or language. Other bills seek to establish a state agency to help newly arrived immigrants, protect immigrants from unscrupulous employers and extend legal protections to avoid detention and deportation, according to a written summary of the legislation.
[Voice of OC] Santa Ana Council Will Debate Downtown ‘Wellness District’
Apr 07, 2015 |

[Voice of OC] Santa Ana Council Will Debate Downtown ‘Wellness District’

The Santa Ana City Council Tuesday night is scheduled to discuss creating a "wellness district" in the city's downtown core that would affirm its Latino character and promote the health and well being of the area’s working-class residents. The proposed district is in response to a study last year by economist Jeb Bruegmann that found Central Santa Ana residents to be a largely untapped economic resource in the downtown. According to Bruegmann's study, which was funded by the California Endowment, the city could bring in an additional $137 million in spending to the downtown by creating a Latino business corridor that focuses on bringing back customers who, despite living so close to the downtown, have been lost to big-box retailers.
[Huffington Post] Right Here In The U.S., Over 1 Million Rural Residents Don't Have Clean Water. Here's Who's Helping
Apr 07, 2015 |

[Huffington Post] Right Here In The U.S., Over 1 Million Rural Residents Don't Have Clean Water. Here's Who's Helping

More than 1 million Californians don’t have access to clean drinking water and it has nothing to do with the historic drought that’s been ravaging the state. California’s severe drought, which entered its fourth year in October, has left communities distraught over cracked lakes and unusable houseboats. But in rural areas, more than 1 million residents have long been struggling to just get access to potable water due to inadequate infrastructure and contaminated water sources, according to nonprofit group Aqua4All. The situation is so grave that many low-income families have no choice but to spend upwards of 10 percent of their incomes on bottled water, because drinking from a contaminated source can lead to cancer, thyroid problems and other serious health issues. Others resort to imbibing sweetened beverages, which are safe for consumption, but are loaded with sugar, which is of particular concern in California where the diabetes rate has increased by 35 percent in the last decade.
[Associated Press] California districts seek to extend waiver of education law
Apr 01, 2015 |

[Associated Press] California districts seek to extend waiver of education law

Six of California's largest urban school districts have applied for a waiver freeing them from requirements of the nation's No Child Left Behind education law. Fresno, Long Beach, LosAngeles, Oakland, San Francisco and Santa Ana unified school districts applied Tuesday for a three-year extension of a waiver first granted in 2013 to a coalition of California districts after the state chose not to request a waiver. The U.S. Department of Education began granting waivers to the Bush-era law in 2012 as talks to reauthorize No Child Left Behind stalled in Congress. The law required all students to test proficient in math and reading by 2014 or face a series of interventions.
[Ed Source] Advocates of state’s parent-trigger law seek to expand its influence
Apr 02, 2015 |

[Ed Source] Advocates of state’s parent-trigger law seek to expand its influence

Five years after California parents gained the power to initiate major changes at failing schools, advocates of the state’s controversial parent-trigger law are expanding their strategies to broaden its influence. Former State Sen. Gloria Romero, the law’s author, founded a nonprofit last year to educate parents about the California Parent Empowerment Act. Even as Romero launched her initiative, another group of parent-trigger-campaign veterans had already started working to develop a more collaborative approach to turning around troubled schools.
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