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[California Health Report] Youth Suicide Rates are Disproportionately Higher in Rural Areas
Mar 23, 2015 |

[California Health Report] Youth Suicide Rates are Disproportionately Higher in Rural Areas

Suicide rates among youths and young adults living in rural areas are almost twice as high as those living in urban areas, a recent study has found. The disproportion increased between 1996 and 2010, “suggesting widening rural-urban disparities,” says the study, published in the peer-reviewed journal, JAMA Pediatrics on March 9. “Suicide rates for adolescents and young adults are higher in rural than in urban communities regardless of the method used, and rural-urban disparities appear to be increasing over time,” the study states. Researchers compared death records from people ages 10 to 24 in all U.S. counties. Between 1996 and 2010, 66,595 of the youths died by suicide. Significantly more males died by suicide than females.
Project Kinship: Healing Trauma and Empowering the Formerly Incarcerated
Mar 23, 2015 |

Project Kinship: Healing Trauma and Empowering the Formerly Incarcerated

Twenty-one months after leaving Orange County’s central jail, I found myself in front of a dozen teenage girls at Huntington Beach’s Ocean View High School.  A gang member by age thirteen and locked up for the first time before my eighteenth birthday, I...
Healing Together
Mar 23, 2015 |

Healing Together

The Healing Together event on January 29, 2015 at The California Endowment’s Center for Healthy Communities nurtured a compelling conversation on trauma, healing, and hope, and carried a strong and loving charge for transformation and...
Mar 23, 2015 |

[KPCC] Raising the minimum wage in LA: 3 studies on the impact

Thursday was a data dump at Los Angeles City Hall as three studies on raising the minimum wage hit the desks of policy makers. Los Angeles's minimum wage currently stands at $9 per hour. Last year, Mayor Eric Garcetti proposed raising it to $13.25 by 2017, and some members of the council said they want to bump it up to $15.25 by 2019. The idea is popular but controversial, prompting policy makers to call for more analysis. The city hired researchers at UC Berkeley to assess the impact. In the Berkeley report, authors said the benefits of raising the minimum wage will outweigh the costs. “The high density of low-wage jobs in Los Angeles means that the benefits of raising the minimum wage will be considerable,” the researchers wrote.
[Sacramento Bee] Opinion: Sacramento County should restore health services to undocumented
Mar 23, 2015 |

[Sacramento Bee] Opinion: Sacramento County should restore health services to undocumented

It’s a statement of our times when politicians exclude poor people from medical services – and people of good conscience shrug their shoulders. This happened to some of the poorest, most vulnerable people in Sacramento County in February 2009. Overwhelmed by the torrent of scary economic news, Sacramento residents raised little objection when the Sacramento County Board of Supervisors voted to stop funding health care for undocumented immigrants. I honestly can’t remember whether I knew about it or not. As with all acts that separate certain people from the broader community, there were – and still are – rationally expressed and earnestly felt justifications for disenfranchising people in Sacramento County. In 2009, at the height of the worldwide recession, the county of Sacramento had a $55 million budget deficit to close, so the poorest of the poor became expendable. But economics aren’t the only reason there wasn’t widespread outcry over this decision. It’s simple: The poor people who were losing all but emergency access to health care were undocumented.
[Pacific Standard] What If Education Reform Got It All Wrong in the First Place?
Mar 18, 2015 |

[Pacific Standard] What If Education Reform Got It All Wrong in the First Place?

That’s the conclusion of a growing number of researchers who argue that 30 years of test scores have not measured a decline in public schools, but are rather a metric of the country’s child poverty and the broadening divide of income inequality. It’s been just over 30 years since war was declared on America’s public schools. The opening salvo came with 1983’s A Nation at Risk, the Ronald Reagan-era Department of Education report that alleged that lax schools and ineffective teachers constituted a dire threat to national security.
[Ed Source] Bill seeks to curb lawsuits over physical education minutes
Mar 16, 2015 |

[Ed Source] Bill seeks to curb lawsuits over physical education minutes

On the verge of a final settlement of a lawsuit over noncompliance with physical education requirements, three of the largest districts in the state are supporting a new bill they believe will curtail litigation in the future. The proposed law would require students and parents to use a complaint process run by school districts and the California Department of Education to address allegations that districts are failing to provide physical education as required by the California Education Code.
[Wall Street Journal] Too Much Parenting, Not Enough Exercise
Mar 16, 2015 |

[Wall Street Journal] Too Much Parenting, Not Enough Exercise

Hyper-parenting may increase the risk of physical inactivity in children, a study in the April issue of Preventive Medicine suggests. Children with parents who tended to be overlyinvolved in their academic, athletic and social lives—a child-rearing style known as hyper-parenting—spent less time outdoors, played fewer after-school sports and were less likely to bike or walk to school, friends’ homes, parks and playgrounds than children with less-involved parents.
[Ed Source] New funding law creates disparity among low-income schools
Mar 18, 2015 |

[Ed Source] New funding law creates disparity among low-income schools

The state’s new education funding formula provides extra money for all low-income children, students learning English and foster youth, and contributes more dollars if they make up the bulk of students in a district. But if these “high-need” kids happen to be concentrated in a few schools within wealthier districts, they get less funding than they would receive in a poor district, a recent study revealed. The report also cautioned that districts’ accountability plans lacked the information to determine if the students were receiving the help they needed.
[Contra Costa Times] Study: Nearly 80 percent of Hispanics in L.A. metro area struggling to make ends meet
Mar 18, 2015 |

[Contra Costa Times] Study: Nearly 80 percent of Hispanics in L.A. metro area struggling to make ends meet

If it weren’t for his children, Joe Sepulveda would gladly leave Los Angeles for a cheaper place to live. Sepulveda, 41, of Reseda, who is unmarried and pays child support for his five kids, was laid off from his job as a drug and alcohol counselor in January and is now living on his unemployment insurance and earnings from odd jobs, he said. Even when he was fully employed and with the relatively low rent he pays to rent a room, he still found himself struggling to cover his costs.
[Richmond Confidential] “The Run and Only” basketball league gives the NBA a run for its money
Mar 17, 2015 |

[Richmond Confidential] “The Run and Only” basketball league gives the NBA a run for its money

Six months into its first season, Anderson says the league is about three things: “It’s about respecting the guys who had sacrificed their whole lives to play the game of basketball, it’s about providing cheap and terrific entertainment to the community and it’s about saving the game of basketball.” The players, who work other day jobs, get paid $150 per game if they are on the winning team and $35 if they are on the losing one. But off the court is where these players really get paid—all of them have access to health insurance, a financial coach and a job-hunting assistant. “These are the things we do for the guys off the court and that is more meaningful for us than the basketball,” said Anderson.
[Richmond Confidential] Small efforts help library accessibility widen in Richmond
Mar 19, 2015 |

[Richmond Confidential] Small efforts help library accessibility widen in Richmond

Sixth grader Clemon Brown loves reading books, but he has a hard time finding books outside of school. “Two weeks ago, I was sitting in my room [and] I want to read a book,” Brown said. He said he wanted to visit a library, but his mom’s car wasn’t working at the time. Brown lives in North Richmond, almost three miles away from the nearest Richmond public library. “That’s really the difficulty,” Richmond Public Library Director Katy Curl said. “[We’re] trying to make sure that we take into account that it’s hard for some people to access us.”
[The Know Fresno] No More Slumlords Aims to Rid Fresno of Absent Landlords
Mar 17, 2015 |

[The Know Fresno] No More Slumlords Aims to Rid Fresno of Absent Landlords

For many Fresnans, home is not necessarily a welcoming place. Many families live in unsafe and unhealthy conditions, such as in units with broken plumbing, toxic mold, rodent infestations and faulty wiring and gas lines. In addition, absentee and negligent landlords contribute to blighted conditions and homes where criminal activities take place unchecked. This is why Sergio and Ashley Cortes founded No More Slumlords, a social media campaign which urges Fresnans to get involved to ensure a safe and healthy living environment for all.
[Fox 40] Sacramento County holds Workshop on Healthcare for the Undocumented
Mar 19, 2015 |

[Fox 40] Sacramento County holds Workshop on Healthcare for the Undocumented

When contemplating a trip to the ER, your biggest concern may be how long you’ll have to wait to get seen. But imagine trying to talk yourself out of going at all — no matter how sick you are — because your immigration status prevents you from getting medical coverage. “Most people have a regular doctor when they feel sick…take a phone a make a call, we can not do that…. and that’s not easy. It’s not easy,” said housekeeper Gloria Casillos.
[Sierra Sun Times] UCLA Professor Says Insuring Undocumented Residents Could Help Solve Multiple U.S. Health Care Challenges
Mar 19, 2015 |

[Sierra Sun Times] UCLA Professor Says Insuring Undocumented Residents Could Help Solve Multiple U.S. Health Care Challenges

Latinos are the largest ethnic minority group in the United States, and it’s expected that by 2050 they will comprise almost 30 percent of the U.S. population. Yet they are also the most underserved by health care and health insurance providers. Latinos’ low rates of insurance coverage and poor access to health care strongly suggest a need for better outreach by health care providers and an improvement in insurance coverage.
[Orange County Register] Santa Ana delays decision on Latino-focused downtown 'Wellness District'
Mar 18, 2015 |

[Orange County Register] Santa Ana delays decision on Latino-focused downtown 'Wellness District'

SANTA ANA – A plan to create a “Wellness District,” which aims to retain the Latino character of downtown Santa Ana, was delayed Tuesday night. Proposed by a coalition of working groups, including Santa Ana Building Healthy Communities, residents and downtown merchants are asking the City Council approve a resolution that establishes a downtown “Wellness District” to foster retail and activities that are healthy and authentic to Latino character. By doing this, the city will serve loyal Santa Ana residents – who are largely Latino – and attract a broader base of visitors who want a taste of Latino culture, they say. The proposal will come up again at the next City Council meeting April 7. Mayor Pro Tem Vincent Sarmiento said the postponement allows the entire council to consider the resolution. Mayor Miguel Pulido and Councilwoman Angelica Amezcua were absent Tuesday.
Youth Driving Change
Mar 17, 2015 |

Youth Driving Change

California’s young people aren’t just inheriting the future, they’re building it. The energy and action of TCE’s youth partners have made a concrete difference in the lives of millions of Californians.   The Endowment is dedicated to enlisting and...
[Pacific Standard] The Criminalization of Youth
Mar 17, 2015 |

[Pacific Standard] The Criminalization of Youth

As a theatre artist, I regularly work with young people to write and perform stories that speak back to a society that labels them “at risk,” “delinquent,” “dangerous,” and “apathetic.” The youth are smart, engaged, and innovative. And many of them are in prison. Drawing on storytelling, movement, and other approaches to performance, participants between the ages of 13 and 21 explore gender, racial justice, and how identity shapes experience in the Performing Justice Project I co-direct with Lynn Hoare at the University of Texas-Austin
[Voice of OC] An Exercise Awakening in Santa Ana
Mar 17, 2015 |

[Voice of OC] An Exercise Awakening in Santa Ana

With the booming hip-hop music and bouncer sporting a leather jacket and hoodie, the pre-dawn scene at Santa Ana Stadium could have, at first glance, been mistaken for an all-night rave. But the 250 or so people gathered together at 5 a.m. on a recent Wednesday weren't ending a night of excess -- they were beginning their day with Payan X, Santa Ana's burgeoning exercise phenomenon. The free community workouts, which feature volunteer trainers, draw between 100 and 450 people to the stadium on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, and have become part of a community health awakening of sorts in Santa Ana.
[Los Angeles Times] Minority families struggle to break out of poverty, study finds
Mar 17, 2015 |

[Los Angeles Times] Minority families struggle to break out of poverty, study finds

eneration from now, minority workers are expected to make up the majority of the American workforce. But today, their families are far more likely to be poor than their white counterparts, according to an analysis of Census data released Monday. The study, by the Working Poor Families Project, showed that working poor families are three times more likely to be headed by a minority parent. In California, 44% percent of families headed by a working minority parent are considered low-income, compared to 16% of white families, researchers found.
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