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Human Rights Month: Article 25 Declares Everyone has the Right to Health Care
Dec 19, 2014 |

Human Rights Month: Article 25 Declares Everyone has the Right to Health Care

Here at The California Endowment, we’re celebrating December as Human Rights Month and commemorating the day the United Nations adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.  One of the most relevant articles to our work, Article 25 of the...
Eastern Coachella Valley Building Healthy Communities: Let’s celebrate & shape the New Year
Dec 19, 2014 |

Eastern Coachella Valley Building Healthy Communities: Let’s celebrate & shape the New Year

This year, the Eastern Coachella Valley BHC closed the year with a community celebration! In partnership with Cornerstone Theater, thirteen community members took to the stage to highlight our 2014 accomplishments and have a community conversation about...
A Holiday Message from California's Youth!
Dec 19, 2014 |

A Holiday Message from California's Youth!

Looking back over the past year I was amazed at all we’ve accomplished together and what really stood out to me was the courageous work of countless young people in communities throughout our state.  It is truly an honor to be able to amplify the voices...
Governing for Racial Equity & Healing Week Reflections
Dec 18, 2014 |

Governing for Racial Equity & Healing Week Reflections

After decades in local government, and three years as the City of Salinas City Manager, I have learned that it is essential that City Government find a means for connecting with its Citizen’s meeting them where they are, rather than where we would like...
A Shifting America: Latinos and a Health Equity-Centered Approach to Juvenile Justice
Dec 16, 2014 |

A Shifting America: Latinos and a Health Equity-Centered Approach to Juvenile Justice

Nestled in California’s lush central coast is the small community of East Salinas, in Monterey County, where I live and raise my children. This region, like many others, is reeling from a history of trauma, inflicted by systemic violence and racism...
An Example of Effecting Change Through Community, Movement Building and Scaling Up
Dec 15, 2014 |

An Example of Effecting Change Through Community, Movement Building and Scaling Up

Low-income people in this country are mired in a constant and unremitting fog of stress. This chronic stress is driven by housing insecurity, food insecurity, fear of crime, unemployment, exposure to pollution and poor education, often collectively conceptualized as the social determinants of health. The buffers against this chronic stress are family support, social connectedness, meaningful opportunity, and a sense of purpose and belonging. The chronic stress is directly controlled by policy and politics, meaning that this situation is largely manmade and thus can be unmade.
[Huffington Post] Grand Theft Auto V and the Culture of Violence Against Women
Dec 10, 2014 |

[Huffington Post] Grand Theft Auto V and the Culture of Violence Against Women

Coming to you, right in time for Christmas, is Grand Theft Auto V. It is a continuation of the violence and sexual denigration of women offered in the previous versions of the Grand Theft Auto games. But, now, taken one step further as the acts of gender-based violence can be played out in first person. In GTA V, a gamer can purchase a woman (or is she a girl?) to perform a menu of different sexual acts that he experiences in first person. After purchasing the woman/girl, the gamer can choose to kill her -- and actually is incentivized to kill her to get his money back. At present, GTA V is one of the most popular and money making video games. If Cambodia, India, or Nigeria produced such a video game, there would be global outrage. It would serve as unequivocal evidence of their misogynistic cultures in which women and girls are systemically raped and murdered with impunity. We would critique the ways in which their cultures and values are organized around the normalization of gendered violence.
Dec 09, 2014 |

[Oakland Tribune] Steps Toward Peace: Oakland Community Organizations leaders walk the talk to reduce gun violence

When I talked with a group of the Oakland Community Organizations leaders in October, they had just marked the two-year anniversary of the weekly Friday night walks through areas of East Oakland that experience some of the worst gun violence in the city. "We walk no matter what," said the Rev. Damita Davis-Howard, assistant pastor of the First Mount Sinai Missionary Baptist Church and organizer of the walks. "Our message is: One, we care, and two, put the guns down." Every Friday night volunteers from all over Oakland meet at one of four East Oakland churches and walk the neighborhood to demonstrate their concern about the individuals at risk of gun violence, as victims or perpetrators, their families and communities. Davis-Howard and the other religious leaders don't use the word "concern." They use the word "love." It's not unusual for 100 people to show up for the walks.
Measure of America’s A Portrait of California 2014–2015
Dec 09, 2014 |

Measure of America’s A Portrait of California 2014–2015

Measure of America, a project of the Social Science Research Council (SSRC), today released its first update to A Portrait of California, a report that measures three areas critical to the well-being of residents of the Golden State: health, education, and earnings. The report utilizes the American Human Development Index (HD Index), a composite measure of these three critical areas, to evaluate socioeconomic opportunities and challenges, providing well-rounded insights about how Californians are truly faring right now and raising implications about conditions that promote or hinder equity across the state.The report is robust, so we took a look specifically at what has changed since the first Portrait in 2011. First, it’s important to recognize that things are indeed progressing. According to A Portrait of California, residents here live longer and earn more than the average American; we’re more likely to graduate on time from high school than previous generations; we’re much less likely to have been arrested for a crime than any generation since the 1950s; and we have better bachelor’s degree completion rates at our state’s public universities. However, it should be no surprise that too many Californians don’t recognize their everyday experience in these data sets. Our state faces both significant opportunities and considerable challenges within these three areas of well-being, all of which have an impact on our residents’ abilities to live healthy, fulfilled lives and position their children to do the same. In the area of education, although Californians have slightly higher bachelors’ and graduate degree attainment rates than the national
California Public Health Departments Leading the Way in Innovative Work To Achieve Health Equity
Dec 08, 2014 |

California Public Health Departments Leading the Way in Innovative Work To Achieve Health Equity

Health Happens with health and justice for all. This was the message conveyed on December 4, when The California Endowment hosted public health department leadership from across the state to honor their unique efforts and innovations to combat health inequities. The Advancing Health Equity Awards: Highlighting Health Equity Practice in California Public Health Departments showcased the work of 13 health departments across the state that goes beyond the traditional scope of public health. This event was created to feature and reward public health departments that are at the forefront of redefining health and health care to include health equity practices rooted in strong community partnership and focused on the conditions that drive health outcomes – from safe parks to quality education to fair housing. The event also served to inform and inspire others committed to improving health equity. The California Endowment's Director of Healthy Communities - North Region Sandra Witt at the podium California has always been a leader in innovation, and the same holds true for our local public health departments working to achieve health equity. By facing some of California’s most difficult challenges head on, they are working to make communities around the state safer, healthier, and stronger for everyone. State leaders, including Darrell Steinberg, attended the gala, showing their support and appreciation for the progress each of the 13 departments nominated are making towards achieving health equity in California. from left: TCE's Director of Communications Leticia Alejandrez and California State Senator Darrell Steinberg A committee of public health leaders from across the
RISE UP Conference: Lifting Up Struggles, Confronting Injustice
Dec 01, 2014 |

RISE UP Conference: Lifting Up Struggles, Confronting Injustice

I hold the spirit of my community and friends of Stockton in my heart as I experience the privilege of attending Fusion's Rise Up conference. Our faces and colors are lacking but the content of what is being said is the story of our struggles. "There are more black males incarcerated today than there were slaves during slavery." Senator Cory Booker started the day the right way. I believe we cannot talk about global social injustices and movements before confronting and talking about the greatest injustice in our country... mass incarceration. I'm glad the criminal in-justice system was challenged by the first speaker. The first panel consisted of activists from Mexico, Sierra Leone, Taiwan and Venezuela. They shared their experiences in social revolutions in their home countries. Gisela Perez de Acha inspired me as she spoke of the realities of resistance in Mexico and staying true to one's identity. Sofia Campos... undocumented, unafraid and unapologetic. I felt connected to her as she spoke with fire and passion and truly represented our gente's struggle. I believe immigrant families and incarcerated families must stand in solidarity to end the separation of families, the intimidation by law enforcement and social exclusion. I appreciate these speakers for speaking their truth to a group that needs to hear it in order for them to be effective. Thank you to The California Endowment for this opportunity, I am truly grateful!
RISE UP Conference: Inspiring Young Leaders to Build Power
Dec 01, 2014 |

RISE UP Conference: Inspiring Young Leaders to Build Power

My name is Daniel Jimenez. I have always had passion for the world of media and journalism. I remember when I was a kid, I use to play that I was a reporter covering breaking news all over the world. The funny thing is that I never saw myself as a writer, in fact, I didn’t even like to write papers for my classes in high school or college. Everything changed when I was introduced to South Kern Sol (SKS). A position as a writer opened and I took it. At the beginning, I started writing in Spanish, my first language, but then I started making the transition into English. SKS is a branch of New America Media, the country's first and largest national collaboration and advocate of 3,000 ethnic news organizations. With SKS, we aim to bring light and truth about the issues that are important to the community of Southern Kern County. I have been part of this organization for approximately a year now and I have written many articles about different topics such as: health, animal welfare, immigration, cultural events, and education. I really enjoy working as a writer for many reasons. I have been able to inform my community and meet extraordinary individuals. SKS has also opened many doors for me; the most recent one was been able to go to Washington DC to RISE UP, a conference hosted by Fusion Networks. When I was asked if I wanted to go to this conference, I didn’t have to think twice about
[Oakland Tribune] Steps Toward Peace: Young men who are transforming their lives in Oakland
Nov 25, 2014 |

[Oakland Tribune] Steps Toward Peace: Young men who are transforming their lives in Oakland

They talk about their work, the exams they've passed. Their future. "I passed the test to be a dog handler," said Jabari, 33, who asked not to use his last name because of concerns about past associations. He works for a dog-grooming company. "I had to learn about 300 dogs, their names and behaviors, certain dogs don't get along with other dogs, their medical needs." Terrell Elliott, 32, has his own business as a personal trainer, Trans4mation Fitness. "I went to a personal training class for a year and got three certificates." He's majoring in kinesiology at a community college. The name of Elliott's business could be the title of their story. The two have transformed, turning their backs on a life of criminal behavior and taking the steps, sometimes difficult, to build a lawful future. They ran into each other at the Oakland Unite offices when they came to talk to me; they knew each other from the streets. They both said they were making changes when they were called in to a Ceasefire meeting. At the call-ins, law enforcement officers and community representatives warn the young men to stop their criminal activities and offer resources to change their lifestyle, such as job training and education.
Bob's Blog: Giving Thanks To Our Grantees….for Health Justice
Nov 24, 2014 |

Bob's Blog: Giving Thanks To Our Grantees….for Health Justice

During the church service I regularly attend, there is a moment of reflection entitled “Prayers of Thanksgiving”, where gratitude and appreciation is expressed by our congregation.  Two of the stanzas struck me as particularly relevant to the work of ...
It's Open Enrollment and Cristina Saralegui is Spreading the Word!
Nov 19, 2014 |

It's Open Enrollment and Cristina Saralegui is Spreading the Word!

Saturday marked the first day of open enrollment for Covered California and reminds us that we need to enroll in health coverage, whether through Medi-Cal or private plans through Covered California. Covered California enrollment runs from November ...
Healing from the Harmful Effects of Childhood Trauma
Nov 17, 2014 |

Healing from the Harmful Effects of Childhood Trauma

  Dave Lockridge of Merced talked about how he combines the Bible lessons with brain science to overcome the harmful legacy of childhood trauma such as physical and sexual abuse.  Pediatrician Nadine Burke Harris of San Francisco described how ...
Transgender Day Of Remembrance: Never Forget Those We've Lost
Nov 19, 2014 |

Transgender Day Of Remembrance: Never Forget Those We've Lost

On November 20th each year, communities across the globe come together for Transgender Day of Remembrance, an international day of mourning to remember transgender people who have been lost to violence. Transgender Day of Remembrance (also known as ...
Building Healthy Communities Del Norte and Adjacent Tribal Lands: Teens Take on School Lunches and Teen Drinking
Nov 17, 2014 |

Building Healthy Communities Del Norte and Adjacent Tribal Lands: Teens Take on School Lunches and Teen Drinking

The California Endowment’s Del Norte and Adjacent Tribal Lands Building Healthy Communities partner, Humboldt Area Foundation (HAF), was recently highlighted in CFLeads publication, “Community Foundations and Resident Engagement, Stories From the ...
[Voice of San Diego] San Diego’s Richest Poor Neighborhood, Two Decades Later
Nov 18, 2014 |

[Voice of San Diego] San Diego’s Richest Poor Neighborhood, Two Decades Later

City Heights could be San Diego’s richest poor neighborhood. It has the highest concentration of nonprofit groups in San Diego County. And since 2000, two foundations alone have invested more than $265 million in the neighborhood of 70,000. That’s nearly the same amount the city of Chula Vista spends on its 260,000 residents annually. But despite that mammoth injection of cash, the foundations that have made long-term commitments to the neighborhood – Price Philanthropies in 1993 and The California Endowment in 2010 – have little hard evidence to show they’ve improved the lives of residents there.
[Article] Land Use in South L.A.: A Legacy of Environmental Crime
Nov 17, 2014 |

[Article] Land Use in South L.A.: A Legacy of Environmental Crime

Freeway pollution. Auto-body shop fumes. Airplane exhaust. These are just some of the pollution sources that residents rattled off at our recent community conference, Environmental Health Challenges in South Los Angeles. As they huddled over the maps of their South L.A. neighborhoods, residents shared stories of the constant rumble of trucks driving past their homes, and the steady streams of planes flying overhead into and out of the Los Angeles International Airport. Nodding in understanding of each other's stories, they realized they all had something in common: they all experienced pollution in the places where they lived, worked, studied, and played.
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