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In Schools

[Pacific Standard] What If Education Reform Got It All Wrong in the First Place?
Mar 18, 2015 |

[Pacific Standard] What If Education Reform Got It All Wrong in the First Place?

That’s the conclusion of a growing number of researchers who argue that 30 years of test scores have not measured a decline in public schools, but are rather a metric of the country’s child poverty and the broadening divide of income inequality. It’s been just over 30 years since war was declared on America’s public schools. The opening salvo came with 1983’s A Nation at Risk, the Ronald Reagan-era Department of Education report that alleged that lax schools and ineffective teachers constituted a dire threat to national security.
[Ed Source] Bill seeks to curb lawsuits over physical education minutes
Mar 16, 2015 |

[Ed Source] Bill seeks to curb lawsuits over physical education minutes

On the verge of a final settlement of a lawsuit over noncompliance with physical education requirements, three of the largest districts in the state are supporting a new bill they believe will curtail litigation in the future. The proposed law would require students and parents to use a complaint process run by school districts and the California Department of Education to address allegations that districts are failing to provide physical education as required by the California Education Code.
[Wall Street Journal] Too Much Parenting, Not Enough Exercise
Mar 16, 2015 |

[Wall Street Journal] Too Much Parenting, Not Enough Exercise

Hyper-parenting may increase the risk of physical inactivity in children, a study in the April issue of Preventive Medicine suggests. Children with parents who tended to be overlyinvolved in their academic, athletic and social lives—a child-rearing style known as hyper-parenting—spent less time outdoors, played fewer after-school sports and were less likely to bike or walk to school, friends’ homes, parks and playgrounds than children with less-involved parents.
[Ed Source] New funding law creates disparity among low-income schools
Mar 18, 2015 |

[Ed Source] New funding law creates disparity among low-income schools

The state’s new education funding formula provides extra money for all low-income children, students learning English and foster youth, and contributes more dollars if they make up the bulk of students in a district. But if these “high-need” kids happen to be concentrated in a few schools within wealthier districts, they get less funding than they would receive in a poor district, a recent study revealed. The report also cautioned that districts’ accountability plans lacked the information to determine if the students were receiving the help they needed.
[Wall Street Journal] You Can Lead the Students to Water
Mar 16, 2015 |

[Wall Street Journal] You Can Lead the Students to Water

Placing self-serve electronic water dispensers in elementary and high schools significantly increased students’ interest in water as a lunch beverage, though the number choosing milk with meals dropped slightly at first, according to a study in the American Journal of Public Health. The dispensers, called water jets, are clear plastic jugs with levers that dispense cooled tap water. Installing water jets in some New York City schools is part of a national anti-obesity program to encourage water consumption, but the effects on water and milk intake weren’t known, researchers said. Changes in milk drinking are a potential concern because of the loss of important nutrients, they said.
Diversity Key to Finding Meaningful Solutions
Mar 16, 2015 |

Diversity Key to Finding Meaningful Solutions

If you’re reading this blog post, then you’re probably very familiar with a fundamental message of the The California Endowment: that where we live plays a powerful role in the health of our families, too often with devastating results.  The geographic...
[Ed Source] One in three California students reported being bullied
Mar 09, 2015 |

[Ed Source] One in three California students reported being bullied

One in three California middle school and high school students reported having been harassed or bullied at least once in the previous year, according to new data from a statewide student survey. Thirty-four percent of students in grades 7, 9 and 11 said they had been bullied one or more times, according to the 2011-13 California Healthy Kids Survey, which is administered by the California Department of Education.
[Inside Bay Area] Time to re-examine the thuggish security force in Oakland schools
Mar 09, 2015 |

[Inside Bay Area] Time to re-examine the thuggish security force in Oakland schools

Oakland students and faculty can't feel safe in their schools if the officers charged with providing security behave like thugs. First, we learned that a security guard at Oakland High School allegedly handcuffed, punched and dumped a student with cerebral palsy out of his wheelchair. Now, we're told, two security guards at Fremont High School beat a student in an apparently unprovoked attack. Both incidents happened last year, before Superintendent Antwan Wilson and Police Chief Jeff Godown started working for the school district. Now it's up to them to clean up the district's security operations.
[New York Times] Feeding Kids Well
Mar 11, 2015 |

[New York Times] Feeding Kids Well

How the School Nutrition Association became an ally of what you might call the “let them eat cake” forces is a long story. What matters is that if, like the association, you’re taking a stand against the 2010 Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act — from a food perspective, among the two or three most progressive pieces of legislation of the Obama administration — you are simply on the wrong side. You’ve pitted yourself not only against better nutrition for current school kids but, even more important, against better nutrition for future students and adults.
[Ed Source] Restorative practices quickly cut suspensions in middle school
Mar 10, 2015 |

[Ed Source] Restorative practices quickly cut suspensions in middle school

There are often expectations for a new superintendent to make an immediate impact in his or her district. That was the case when I became superintendent at Standard School District in Bakersfield in November 2013, just as the new Local Control Accountability Plan (LCAP) was unfolding. Being new to the district and the area, the needs assessment required by the LCAP served me well as an educational leader. It didn’t take long to identify the areas of need or to come to agreement on how to address them.
Not Just A Leader, But A Changemaker
Mar 10, 2015 |

Not Just A Leader, But A Changemaker

In continuing the drumbeat my co-fellow, Alheli Cuenca, began by sharing her story, I ask that you join me as I share my exploration of self-leadership and how this journey has led me to become a Health Equity Fellow working on issues at the intersection...
What We've Learned from the First Three Years of Building Healthy Communities
Mar 09, 2015 |

What We've Learned from the First Three Years of Building Healthy Communities

As is always the case for busy foundation staff, having time to reflect, while essential, sometimes feels like a luxury. The California Endowment, however, is being intentional in this regard as the stakes are high for the 14 places that make up Building...
Mar 03, 2015 |

[Ed Source] Bill would require ‘breakfast after the bell’ at more schools

Taking aim at the effect of hunger on students’ ability to learn, two California legislators announced Tuesday a bill that would require more schools to provide breakfast after the start of school. The proposed legislation would revamp the way many schools operate the federal School Breakfast Program, widely regarded as an underutilized source of nutrition for hungry students. Districts are also aware that under-enrollment in the school breakfast program has left millions of dollars on the table in federal meal reimbursements for low-income students.
[Ed Source] New state preschool funding is having an impact
Mar 02, 2015 |

[Ed Source] New state preschool funding is having an impact

A once-empty preschool in south San Jose is now filled with 44 children, spending their days eagerly peering at insects through mega magnifying glasses or linking plastic gears to create contraptions. Most of the children at Eden Palms Child Development Center in San Jose are from families that are unable to pay for preschool. The students are some of the 10,000-plus children from low-income families throughout California who are benefiting from an influx of state funding for preschools in 2014-15.
From Fresno to Greenlining
Mar 02, 2015 |

From Fresno to Greenlining

Earlier this month, Juan Reynoso wrote about the Health Equity Fellows and the journey we’ve embarked on together. To help this all make a little more sense, we’re each going to tell you a bit about ourselves and what landed us here. My story begins in...
Our kids have a right to safe water
Mar 02, 2015 |

Our kids have a right to safe water

Hi lovely people, Jamie here. As you guys might know, part of my foundation is based out in California and we’ve recently teamed up with a wonderful institution, The California Endowment, who are doing great work promoting better health in the...
[Boyle Heights Beat] More LAUSD high schools serve breakfast in the classroom
Feb 23, 2015 |

[Boyle Heights Beat] More LAUSD high schools serve breakfast in the classroom

It’s second period at Francisco Bravo Medical Magnet in Boyle Heights and the sound of squeaky wheels coming down the hallway interrupts the students working frantically on the school yearbook.A student worker walks in with a small steel cart and lifts a blue bag to reveal cereal boxes, milk cartons and granola bars. Most students push back their chairs and head toward the front of the class to pick up their breakfasts. Throughout Los Angeles Unified School District, this new program, Breakfast in the Classroom, provides food for children in their classrooms between 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. The menu changes daily, and students eat at desks that were previously used strictly for schoolwork.
[EdSource] Report reveals national ‘discipline gap’
Feb 26, 2015 |

[EdSource] Report reveals national ‘discipline gap’

A study of national suspension rates shows a “discipline gap,” with African-American and disabled students having the highest rates and Asian and white students the lowest. Altogether, 3.5 million public school students were suspended from school at least once in 2011-12. “Given that the average suspension is conservatively put at 3.5 days, we estimate that U.S. public school children lost nearly 18 million days of instruction in just one school year because of exclusionary discipline,” according to the study, Are We Closing the School Discipline Gap?, by The Civil Rights Project at UCLA. Out-of-school suspensions, the authors say, exacerbate the achievement gap. They point to a 2014 study by Attendance Works that found that missing three days of school in the month before taking the National Assessment of Educational Progress test translated into 4th-graders scoring a full grade level lower in reading on the test. The UCLA study found a suspension rate for middle and high school students of 23.2 percent for African-American students and 18.1 percent for students with physical and mental disabilities. That compares with 6.7 percent for white students and 2.5 percent for Asian students. Latino students had a suspension rate of 10.8 percent.
Statement from The California Endowment's President and CEO on Governor Brown's Appointment of Karen Smith as Director of California's Department of Public Health
Feb 26, 2015 |

Statement from The California Endowment's President and CEO on Governor Brown's Appointment of Karen Smith as Director of California's Department of Public Health

It is with great pleasure that I congratulate Karen Smith who has been appointed director of the California Department of Public Health by Governor Jerry Brown. Both her education and vast experience in the fields of infectious disease and public health...
Attorney General Launches New Bureau of Children's Justice
Feb 26, 2015 |

Attorney General Launches New Bureau of Children's Justice

"We simply cannot let down our most vulnerable children today, then lock them up tomorrow and act surprised." With that statement, Attorney General Kamala Harris has launched the California Department of Justice's new Bureau of Children's Justice to...
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